The Student(s) and the Teacher(s)

Last Christmas my daughter received a Youtube gift package from me. Well, me and her two favorite Youtubers: Bob Claggett and April Wilkerson. It had stickers and pencils along with a really cool note from Bob. This meant she needed a place to put the stickers. Coincidentally, she also needed a place to store some of her tools. I knew just the project: a modified version of this Japanese toolbox built by Chris Schwarz a few years ago.

I longed for connections on multiple levels. On one level, I wanted my daughter to do most of the building. On another, I elected to use scrap wood to instill the need to be thrifty and thoughtful in our selections. The first source of wood my daughter found on a walk back from the bus stop; a neighbor had tossed out some nice poplar from a built in bookcase. She asked why someone would throw out perfectly good wood [my heart grew three sizes]. The second source came from dismantling one of my first woodworking projects: an ill-fitted toolbox I made for my mom shortly after my dad passed. With my mom moving out of the home she’d raised us in after 50 years, I knew she no longer needed this functional, sentimental item. The layers were brooding nicely.

IMG_1098

The starting point

The plans were straight forward but I didn’t want the finickiness of finger joints so I went with rabbets and cut nails. This way I could do the joinery quickly and then have my daughter bang things together. I have little experience with the router table so it was great to use the one at my community shop. It made the joints easy and accurate.

I milled up the rest of the parts and then sanded them to 150 grit. This was perfect prep for the Gypsy Pink milk paint from Real Milk Paint Co. With things painted, we started doing the joinery. We used a practice box to get the feel of driving in nails and then went on to the real thing. We even got to bust out an egg beater drill I found in my grandfather’s basement before we moved him out of his house (read: layers, baby).

The box was built and ready for the lid. I wanted to impart a lesson on design and asked if she would like to make the lid a bit flashier. I had some extra maple from the drawer sides of her dresser and knew they’d add pizzaz. Unfortunately, the board was juuuust a bit small to cover the entire opening. I explained we only needed about ¼” of material to fit the lid and use this as another design opportunity. She really likes purpleheart so I glued up a panel with a racing stripe.

And there the box sat for a while. She lost interest and I didn’t want to push things. Inspiration struck while we were out at Sherwin Williams. She saw this display and wanted to know if we could buy some stain. I didn’t know this but they can mix up any color on the display using a base formula. Plus, it was only $8 for a quart. Score.

Again, the project sat for a few weeks and she didn’t want to work on it. I finally asked her if she just wanted me to finish it and she said yes. Her sister offered to help with the stain and I put everything together on my own one afternoon.

When it was all done she immediately got out her stickers and started putting her tools in it. She also gave me a big hug. The box has been completed for two months and she asks to go into the shop constantly. I’m glad I let her dictate the pace and I’m also glad I finished it for her. At the time I was a little disappointed she didn’t do more of the “work” herself. But upon reflection, I realized she was teaching me a lesson in patience and restraint. You gotta love the layers.

Advertisements

About Shawn Nichols

Heady. Phishy. Woodworker
This entry was posted in General Philosophy, Kids Furniture and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Student(s) and the Teacher(s)

  1. tombuhl says:

    Shawn, I like your sense of layers and patience. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

Let me know what you think...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s