Two Each. Her Own.

In my brief tenure as a father, I’ve learned many lessons. One of the most crucial came shortly after our second daughter was born. I was concerned I would never love a second child as much as I loved the first. Even while being the very distant third (cough…11 years) in a three-child family, I never experienced this feeling first hand. My parents were, and mom still is, good at loving us without favoritism or inequality. But as month eight turned into nine I couldn’t rationalize the data: how did my parents do this? How could I pour the same amount of attention and love into a second child? The answers came the moment I saw her and during the first hours of her life: attention is finite and we’d have to manage it, but love is infinite and grows without effort or control. It’s one of my favorite lessons.

Shifting gears, I’ll let you in on another lesson: sometimes siblings need their own stuff. And when there is only one of something, like a cool outdoor chair, the results aren’t pretty. I fixed the chair problem just as the summer outdoor seating season started. You may recall a post about this last year regarding building a second Ana White kid’s adirondack chair.

I didn’t take any progress pictures after that post but I completed the build effort during the fall. I even had enough pine from the recycled shelves to make two chairs. I opted to experiment with General Finishes while chalk paint for one and Real Milk Paint (in Gypsy Pink) for my daughter – her choice obviously.  It’s hard to express into words how apropos “gypsy” is to my always-barefoot, free-spirited second child. But you’ll get the idea when you see the stencil she chose for decoration. We even got mommy in the shop to help us put on the finishing touches.

I wasn’t too impressed with the GF chalk paint as it acted more like latex and less like milk paint; especially in terms of running down vertical services. I say this in comparison to milk paint which doesn’t run (at least not much). But the real pain came with the top coat. In previous milk paint projects I’ve used GF polyacrylic as a top coat. I made a sample board and tested it with the same stuff I’d used before and got positive results. Unfortunately, after applying a coat to the real project the results looked awful. There was a milky white haze throughout.

I quickly jumped on the Wood Whisperer Guild facebook page and posted my dilemma. After some digging, I realized GF stopped making that version of polycrylic a few years ago even though my can was only about 18 months old to me. I was burned by really, really, old finish. I sanded with 320 grit as best I could and picked up a can of spray on Minwax polycrylic from the big box store. It’s not perfect but it’ll do. The lesson here is to get new finish more regularly and definitely pre finish parts as best as you can – especially on this type of build. With the plants and container garden flourishing I took these shots of the chairs.

I was thinking of selling the white chair but decided it’s best to just give it to my neighbor, who I mentioned in my last post.

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Here my girls are playing in the chairs with our neighbors during a Fourth of July get together

You’ll be happy to know it’s been a favorite of his two kids, which brings us full circle: he just bought the wood to build a second chair on his own. I hope he’ll ask for help at least once. I’ve been thinking it might be time to purchase him a copy of Nick Offerman’s latest book followed up by Schwarz’s seminal ATC if he takes the bait.

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About Shawn Nichols

Heady. Phishy. Woodworker
This entry was posted in Kids Furniture, Three Season Room and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Two Each. Her Own.

  1. Jeff Whitaker says:

    PLEASE!!!! Not one of Offerman’s gratuitous tomes to his inflated sense of self worth.. try Paul Sellers or Schwarz or any number of other real books on wood working.

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    • Jeff, thanks for your comment. I always welcome the ideas of others.

      I stand behind my recommendation of Offerman’s book. I see it as a vehicle to bring the curious into the craft; a gateway book for sure. Chris Schwarz’s book are fine in their own right but I don’t him as the first author non-woodworkers should read. Admittedly, I don’t know much about Paul Sellers so I can’t say one way or the other. Asa Christiano has a new book coming out, which might also be a good first recommendation. I think it’s important for people get a feel for projects and building before going too deep. Nick does that beautifully in his latest book.

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