Topping It Off

One of the coolest parts of this project was heading out to the lumber yard with my mom and finding the right board to go on the top. We sifting through many boards but ended up going with some 14″ reclaimed wormy chestnut. This would give the rustic look she wanted and give me an opportunity to work with a new species. I’ll be looking for chestnut in the future. It was a dream to use with hand tools.

Great piece of chestnut - probably off an old barn.

Great piece of chestnut – probably off an old barn.

I knew the chest needed a little bit of help to avoid looking too boxy and basic. Plus I wanted to try out breadboard ends for the first time. My first inclination was to use the Domino DF 500 based on this blog post from Marc. After I thought about it, I didn’t think it would work, so I pulled out my copy of Tom Fidgen’s The Unplugged Woodshop where he used on The Architect’s Table. I knew I didn’t want to do this by hand but I thought the design was a bit more sound than just the dominoes. I remembered a video Glen Huey did on this topic. I figured a combination of these techniques would be perfect.

The next step was to breakdown the big board and make a panel with a smaller piece.

The following morning I woke up with a sudden sinking feeling. I realized I had measured twice and cut once when I broke down the original boards but I didn’t account for the length of the tenons when using the traditional methods Tom and Glen used. Using this approach meant the top would be too short. I spent the whole day trying to figure out what to do. In the end, I went back to my original plan and used Dominos.

With the top done, I broke all the edges with an apron plane, sanded the outside to 150, and started researching milk paint.

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About Shawn Nichols

Heady. Phishy. Woodworker
This entry was posted in Toy Chest and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Topping It Off

  1. Pingback: Working on the Top | While The Glue Dries

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